RESIN VS DIECAST

In a recent discussion in one of my Linkedin groups, one of the members commented that he didn't believe resin would ever replace die-cast. I posted the following in reply to him (see below) and while doing so realised that this is a subject ripe for discussion here, so I'd love to hear your views...

"I agree. I don't think resin will replace die-cast. It is very much a case of horses for courses. Die-cast is always the most viable option for large production runs. However, resin does allow the luxury of more esoteric subject choices. The astronomical costs of tooling up for a new die-cast model means that manufacturers have to sell thousands of units before they start to break even, let alone make a profit; whereas runs as small as a couple of hundred units are completely feasible in resin. 


And yes, resin is fragile but the results can be absolutely stunning. Expensive, yes - but actually the price for say, a Spark model, is not that much more than you will have to pay for an equivalent say, Minichamps, diecast model these days. 

Of course, by its very nature, resin doesn't lend itself to supporting the luxury of opening features (although in fairness few 1:43 scale models include opening features and collectors in this scale do not tend to expect them). However, in the larger scales, while doors, bonnets, boots, etc, that lift to offer views of a well equipped interior, engine replication, etc, can be impressive, unless these opening features are done exceptionally well they can totally spoil the lines of a model (we have seen models with some shocking and totally inappropriate barn door-like hinges, for example). 

I confess to having been wowed by intricate engine detail and stunningly realistic interiors as much as the next person, but such features clearly add to cost and length of production time. In high end collectables I think that's acceptable, but I sometimes wonder why certain manufacturers bother, as it's either worth doing well or not all, in my opinion. 

The larger scale resin models from Otto are going down a storm in Europe despite not boasting opening features and we're seeing some really interesting subject choices from this manufacturer too."

 

If you want to learn more about resin production, click on the attached link to see our interview with one of the leading resin model manufacturers

http://www.modelcollector.co.uk/sites/11/documents/spark%20feature.pdf